Bilingual evaluations: Documenting results

In our two previous posts, we talked about the importance of interpreters and how to effectively collaborate with one before, during and after an evaluation.

Once you’ve completed your evaluation it’s time to write up the results…(sigh).

writing-bilingual

For the most part, this won’t be too different from how you report on any of the other endless number of evaluations you complete as a school-based SLP. But there are some very important pieces to include when a student is evaluated in more than one language, with an interpreter.

Remember, most of the tests you just administered weren’t normed in the client’s primary language and they certainly weren’t normed through administration with an interpreter! So be sure you are documenting this information. Specify when and how you collaborated with the interpreter. Which portions were given by you, and which portions by the interpreter?

When documenting your analysis of the test results, be sure to discuss instances when the student may have responded incorrectly in one language but then correctly in the other.

Be careful not to report standard scores when a test is not administered per standardization requirements – read those manuals!

Was the test normed on an English speaking population? Most of them are!

Did you administer it with an interpreter to a student for whom English is not his first language?  Chances are, yes!

Can you report the standard score? Ummmm, no!

However, looking at the score certainly can help guide you as to whether the student is performing within normal limits or not.

And don’t forget to consider the responses in EITHER language. If the question was answered correctly in one language or the other, count it as correct…we’re looking at the SKILLS the student does or does not have, not in which language she demonstrates it.

Keep in mind that we are looking for language disorder, not difference (discussed further in Part 1, here).

One of the trickiest areas is syntax. So much of our English syntax (forms and word order) is different in the primary language. Take a close look at the errors in both languages with these syntax concepts. If the errors are present in both languages (with a syntax form that is expected and developmentally appropriate in both languages), that would be considered an error in syntax.  However, if the errors are only present in English, this would not be considered an impairment with syntax.  Make sure discussion of all of this is included in the report.

Remember, most of the tests you just administered weren’t normed in the client’s primary language and they certainly weren’t normed through administration with an interpreter!

There are a multitude of resources available to delve into the differences between languages – phonemic inventories, influences of one language on another, dialectal differences. ASHA includes phonemic inventories for various languages along with a brief discussion of how to use this information and links to additional resources. Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin has a great book titled Multicultural Students with Special Language Needs-4th Edition covering various topics.

Do you have any go-to resources? Share below.